MapTrap_Negative.png
 
Webimages2-22.png

The Problem

A robust and accurate site map is the foundation for site management and remediation. However, most mapping techniques are intrusive and are not cost effective. The few non-intrusive mapping techniques that currently exist are not specific to petroleum-based biodegradation, nor do they consider environmental variability over time. This makes their use questionable, a non-ideal situation when planning remediation. NSZD and soil gas transport play an important role when mapping oil spills at surface level, as the contaminants generate CO₂ as a byproduct of biodegradation.

Using a non-intrusive technique that provides an unequivocal signal associated with the fossil fuel contaminant can efficiently guide the location of more permanent monitoring wells, significantly reducing overall monitoring costs.  

 

Webimages2-20.png
 
Webimages2-01.png

Grid delineation created using Map Traps  

Webimages2-21.png

Possible monitoring well placement

The Solution

Map Traps are passive samplers that measure CO₂ flux and utilize a qualitative ¹⁴C measurement technique to provide a binary (yes/no) indication of LNAPL presence at testing locations. The Map Traps measure total CO₂ flux over a two to five day period, providing a time-averaged estimate that accounts for environmental variations such as temperature, atmospheric pressure, and tidal changes.

The Map Traps provide a binary indication of biodegradation on LNAPL in the surface which allows for source delineation. This makes the map traps a valuable, cost-effective decision-making tool for the placement of wells and a starting point for future remediation or NSZD monitoring efforts.

 


Product overview video